Hope you all are doing well! I am happy to inform you that "The Arcade Creek Project: A Mosaic of Sustainability" is having an extremely successful festival run. We've only been in the festival circuit for just a few months and have already been accepted to 10 film festivals around the country!

However, what I'm most excited to tell you about is that our WORLD PREMIERE (the film's first public appearance) will be right here at the Sacramento Film and Music Festival! The event will take place at the Jean Runyon Theatre in the Sacramento Memorial Auditorium (1515 J Street, Sacramento) on Saturday, September 23 at 10:00 AM. The world premiere is every film's most important event, and of course, since you all are the reason the documentary became a success, we would love for you to attend.

Friday, 24 April 2009 05:35

The Water Forum

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The Water Forum Agreement is a package of linked elements with two, co-equal objectives:

To provide a reliable water supply for planned development to the year 2030, and

To preserve the Sacramento region's environmental crown jewel, the lower American River.

Thursday, 23 April 2009 16:00

Save Auburn Ravine Salmon and Steelhead

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Save Auburn Ravine Salmon and Steelhead(sarsas.org) is trying to do with one stream, the Auburn Ravine, what must be done to all streams and rivers on the entire West Coast: make the entire length navigable for anadromous fish. Their goal is to work collaboratively and cooperatively to modify the twelve man-made barriers and six plus beaver dams on the Auburn Ravine to make them passable for fish.

SARSAS believes (as does TU!) that the health and well-being of Salmon is directly linked to that of people. If we improve the health and well-being of Salmon, we improve the health and well-being of mankind and therefore ourselves. Salmon are as resilient and adaptive as humans; when they can no longer adapt, neither can mankind.

SARSAS, Courthouse Coffee and California Conservation Corp Clean Up Auburn Ravine

Friday, 24 April 2009 07:30

Sacramento Area Creeks Council

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The Sacramento Area Creeks Council is dedicated to protecting and sharing the abundant natural treasures that make up the extensive creek system of our region.

Using educational programs and annual events open to all age groups, the Council continually brings young and old ever closer to the more than fifty intricate and fascinating creek ecosystems that weave in and out of our neighborhoods, towns and cities.

The Sacramento Area Creeks Council has joined with individuals, schools, neighborhoods, park districts, civic organizations, businesses, and local government to educate the general public about the abundant aesthetic, recreational and ecological values that natural streams offer.

Membership is open to anyone who wishes to participate in the effort to preserve our region's fragile - and vulnerable - creeks.

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Please consider supporting our efforts.


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