Sunday, 15 October 2017 07:44

Fish Counting

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Several times a year Sac-Sierra Trout Unlimited provides volunteers to assist with surveys of Salmon and Steelhead in the watersheds of our territory. This enjoyable and educational activity is simply a walk along (and sometimes in) a creek or river while making a few notes, and its a perfect outing for ages 12 and up*.
The form below can be used at any time of the year to let us know you’d like to help.

When most people think of salmon and steelhead, they think of the big roiling rivers of the west coast: the Sacramento, the American, the Klamath & Trinity, the Columbia. While it's true salmon first appear in those rivers as they return from the ocean, where many of them are actually headed is to the little creeks and ravines that run right through our backyards.

We start by sending volunteer "scouts" out every few days to look for the first fish to appear. These scouts are not counting fish, they're simply trying to determine when the main part of the run will arrive. That's when we'll need to muster our troops. That's when we need all of our volunteers. That's when we need you.

In past years, when we've had large runs, we would sometimes go out and count on 3 or 4 successive Fridays. If the run was small and short-lived, we would only survey on a single Friday. Volunteers are split into 2- or 3-person teams, and assigned different reaches of the creek. They're given everything they need to collect data, although they will need their own wading gear. (You WILL be getting wet!)

Volunteers need to be fairly fit: you may walk as much as 2~4 miles for the day, and you will also need to be somewhat flexible in your availability. The fish determine for themselves when they show up, and we need to be ready to meet them.

* - Kids under 18 will need an accompanying parent or guardian.

Sign up for the mailing list by completing the form here.  Your name and email address will be added to the groups that you select. 

You may select as many as you like, but if you are interested in helping with fish counting, make sure you check that box.

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